Monthly Archives: September 2014

Latuda, a New Weapon in the Fight Against Bipolar Depression

fightPeople with bipolar depression struggle with extreme shifts in mood that range from feeling incredibly active and capable to feeling unmotivated and incapable of even the most menial tasks. Bipolar depression can be so intense that it makes it hard to carry on normal relationships or maintain a steady job. Using the same antidepressants to treat bipolar depression as those used to treat unipolar depression is not always they best option. But living at the whim of crushing depression is not an option either. Where can bipolar patients turn?

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Can Heavy Drinking Before Pregnancy Harm Your Children?

Prenatal Drug Use May Become a CrimeIt’s a well-established fact that alcohol consumption during pregnancy can lead to serious disruption of fetal development and permanent health problems in newborn children. However, not many researchers have considered whether heavy drinking before pregnancy has any harmful impact on the subsequent health of a mother’s children. In a study published in July 2014 in the journal European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, a group of Norwegian researchers explored this issue. They concluded that heavy drinking prior to pregnancy is associated with increased risks for a range of significant behavioral problems in toddlers.

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Mental Illness More Destructive Than Smoking, Study Finds

Untreated Mental Disorders Are Just as Deadly as SmokingAs anyone coping with a serious mental illness knows, these disorders can take a toll on your physical health, your happiness and your quality of life. Now researchers have investigated just how much mental illness can impact your health and well-being. It turns out that having a serious mental illness can shorten your lifespan by up to 20 years, making it as impactful, or more so, than heavy smoking. If you struggle with a mental illness, take action and seek out the best care possible. You have the ability to make sure that your illness does not take over your life.

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Depression and Diabetes Linked to Inflammation

Identifying Signs of DepressionMental and physical health are increasingly being treated in combination. Some mental disorders are not without physical components, and physicians are finding that there is a high risk of mental health problems among those dealing with certain types of illness. For instance, eating disorders and substance use disorders are mental health issues, but they are characterized by important physical symptoms.

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Do You Realize How Much You Drink and What It’s Costing You?

Mislabeled Alcohol Means You May be Drinking More than You ThinkOne out of every five adults in Vermont drinks too much. Vermont is a little above the national average when it comes to how many of its citizen binge drink, but not by much. Binge drinking, having four or more consecutive drinks for a woman and five or more for a man, is a nationwide problem. That means that if something works to help this problem in Vermont, it may be worth trying in other states as well.

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People Predisposed to Schizophrenia Use More Marijuana

SmokerModern scientific research has firmly established that some people who use large amounts of marijuana or other forms of cannabis increase their odds of experiencing psychosis, one of the major symptoms of schizophrenia and several other severe mental illnesses. Research also indicates that the link between cannabis use and schizophrenic or psychotic states of mind may have at least a partially genetic basis. In a study published in June 2014 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, a team of British and Australian researchers sought to uncover the genetic risk profile that connects cannabis intake and schizophrenia. These researchers concluded that the genetic risk apparently runs in both directions, from cannabis use to schizophrenia and from schizophrenia to cannabis use.

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When Soldiers Can’t Leave the Battle Behind

When-Soldiers-Can’t-Leave-the-Battle-BehindThe tragedy at Fort Hood, Texas, in which an Army Specialist shot and killed three people before turning the gun on himself has sparked a national dialogue on identifying and treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The soldier who committed these murders was never officially diagnosed with PTSD but instead was being treated for multiple mental health conditions which included anxiety, sleep problems and depression.

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