Author Archives: lucida

Woman holding neck in pain

4 Physical Illnesses to Watch for If You Have Depression

Although depression is a mental health issue, it also manifests in numerous physical symptoms. Body aches, fatigue and headaches are the most common physical complaints associated with depression.

But it’s possible that these symptoms are signs of not only depression, but also other chronic physical illnesses. Depression may mask the severity of these conditions. In other words, depression may always be blamed for your constant fatigue, even though you suspect that something else is going on. That’s why it’s important to determine your other health risks and receive treatment.

If you have depression, here are four physical illnesses to watch for and to discuss with your doctor. Continue reading

What Not to Say to Someone With Depression or Anxiety

Talking to someone with depression or anxiety may feel like walking a tightrope, especially if you’ve never experienced either mental health disorder yourself. On the one hand, you want to be supportive and encouraging and to show that you care. On the other hand, you don’t want to accidentally make your friend feel worse. Here are some common sayings to avoid, and some suggestions of what to say instead: Continue reading

Women Who Binge/Purge Suffer Short-Term Memory Impairment

Does Racism Cause Depression?

Racism and discrimination place innumerable barriers, visible and invisible, on people who experience it. Those barriers impact myriad aspects of an individual’s life, not the least of which is their access to mental health treatment. The tragic irony of this reality is that those who face racism and other forms of discrimination are often those who are the most in need of mental health treatment. Two of the most common types of discrimination, racial and economic, can trigger mental health problems as well as prevent those individuals from getting the help they need to cope. Continue reading

The Catch-22 of Loving an Addict

Loving an addict can feel like riding a roller coaster on a daily basis.  At times things may seem normal, but without warning there is turbulence, unpredictability and a whole lot of stress. You want to believe that everything will be all right and that things will settle down so that you can lead a somewhat normal life. But your daily reality is anything but normal.

More often than you want to admit, your life more closely resembles a circus than a story with a happily-ever-after ending. The addict is compelled to keep using drugs whether you beg, plead, scream or threaten. Friends and family urge you to leave the relationship, but for some reason you haven’t been able to do that. You know that you are putting up with a lot of unacceptable behavior, but you keep hanging on, wishing and hoping that things will change. Worst of all, at times it seems like the person in the relationship that is crazy is you. Continue reading

doctor taking to female patient

Mental Health Disparities Linked to Physician Perception

Statistics clearly show that Hispanics who need treatment for mental health or addiction are less likely to get it than white Americans. We also know that Hispanics have poorer outcomes when treated for substance abuse and are less likely than whites to complete a treatment program. Many possible reasons have been cited for these disparities, including cultural differences, stigma, language barriers and other factors. A large study recently sought to better understand the disparities and came up with some surprising results. Continue reading

Woman holding neck in pain

4 Physical Illnesses to Watch for If You Have Depression

Although depression is a mental health issue, it also manifests in numerous physical symptoms. Body aches, fatigue and headaches are the most common physical complaints associated with depression.

But it’s possible that these symptoms are signs of not only depression, but also other chronic physical illnesses. Depression may mask the severity of these conditions. In other words, depression may always be blamed for your constant fatigue, even though you suspect that something else is going on. That’s why it’s important to determine your other health risks and receive treatment.

If you have depression, here are four physical illnesses to watch for and to discuss with your doctor. Continue reading

depressed boy sitting down with hands in face

Mental Health and the Immigrant Paradox

Statistics and research show that first-generation Hispanic immigrants to the U.S. are less likely to have mental health and substance use disorders than Caucasian Americans and later-generation immigrants. We call this the immigrant paradox. In spite of many factors that one might assume would lead to a greater instance of mental illness and substance abuse, like poverty and trauma, these immigrants are protected by their birth status. Their offspring do not have the same protective factor. Researchers are working to explore and explain this intriguing paradox. Continue reading

Hispanic Addiction Rates

Addiction Increasing Among Hispanics

Hispanics are now 17 percent of the population in the U.S.; a minority still, but a significant and growing one. In fact, estimates say that the population will rise to 30 percent by 2050. As the population of American Hispanics grows, the concerns of this demographic become more important. Among these concerns is addiction. Statistics show that rates of substance abuse and addiction are on the rise among Hispanics. However, access to treatment and the quality of that treatment are static at best.
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Addiction and Stereotypes

Stereotypes Held by Healthcare Providers Affect Substance Abuse Treatment for Hispanics

People of all races, ethnicities and backgrounds are impacted by substance abuse and addiction. Not nearly enough people are treated or treated effectively for these issues, but the Hispanic population in the U.S. is particularly vulnerable to lack of care. Researchers have tried to investigate the discrepancy between this population and others when it comes to addiction care and have determined that healthcare providers often believe in certain cultural stereotypes that prevent Hispanics from seeking help. Continue reading

man comforting women on couch

Depression Undertreated in Hispanic Communities

Depression is a serious mental illness that requires regular treatment, but one group of people is notgetting the help it needs. A recent study surveyed Hispanic populations in the U.S. and found that those with depression are undertreated. Those without health insurance are particularly vulnerable to struggling with depression and not getting treatment. The findings of the study are important and point to changes that need to be made in the medical community to ensure more people get necessary mental healthcare.
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