Category Archives: Mental Health

Holiday Depression and Anxiety

How to Cope With Depression or Anxiety During the Holidays

Many people think of the holidays as the most wonderful time of the year. It’s a festive time of togetherness and merriment, glittering lights and memorable music. But if you are clinically depressed or struggle with anxiety, you may find that your symptoms such as fatigue and gloominess are worse during the holiday season.
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Holiday Depression and Anxiety

How Mental Illness Can Keep You From Enjoying the Holidays, and What to Do About It

The holiday season is quickly approaching. In the space of about a month, people will gather their families together for Thanksgiving, any number of religious celebrations, and New Year’s Eve. And chances are that the thought of hosting or attending so many get-togethers either leaves you with a warm, fuzzy feeling or fills you with dread. Are you ready to forge ahead or is holiday depression holding you back?
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Mental Health and Substance Abuse

When Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Go Hand in Hand

It’s called a dual diagnosis, and it means having a substance use disorder as well as a mental illness. If you struggle with substance abuse, you should be screened for mental health. If you have a mental health issue, you should be cautious about drinking and using drugs. The two go hand in hand, and to have one with the other is not uncommon. It means that you need to address both issues in order to be well and healthy.
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man comforting women on couch

Depression Undertreated in Hispanic Communities

Depression is a serious mental illness that requires regular treatment, but one group of people is notgetting the help it needs. A recent study surveyed Hispanic populations in the U.S. and found that those with depression are undertreated. Those without health insurance are particularly vulnerable to struggling with depression and not getting treatment. The findings of the study are important and point to changes that need to be made in the medical community to ensure more people get necessary mental healthcare.
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Hispanic women looking down

Hispanics Less Likely to Seek Out Mental Health Care

We have plenty of statistical evidence that racial disparities in healthcare for mental illness and addiction exist and that Hispanics are on the losing end. The latest research shows that Hispanic Americans are less likely than Caucasian patients to seek out mental health care. This could be related to culture, access to health insurance or language barriers, but the fact remains that it means thousands of people who need it are not getting mental health treatment.
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Arial View from a Plane of Different Countries

Country of Origin Plays Key Role in Depression Rates Among Hispanics

Many mental health experts worry that mental illnesses, like depression, go underdiagnosed and untreated in much of the Hispanic population of the U.S., which is why any research that goes into this issue is so important. A recent study resulted in a report from Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) that outlines rates of anxiety and depression in American Hispanics. In addition to illustrating that under-treatment is a real problem, the report also demonstrates that rates of depression are highly variable and depend on the country of origin of Hispanic individuals.
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Stressed Young Woman Coping with Anxiety

9 Good Reasons to Get Your Anxiety Under Control Now

Can’t stop worrying? Find it impossible to relax? Living in a constant state of anxiety overextends your brain and body. It may see like worrying can protect you from trouble, but if your fears don’t subside when a threat goes away, you could be facing serious health problems. Take a look at some of the ways anxiety can wreck the way you look and feel.
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man walking away from upset women

6 Steps for Dealing With the Difficult People in Your Life

Everyone’s got at least one in their life: a whiner, blamer, complainer or someone who makes life needlessly difficult for everyone else. In his book Talking to Crazy, Mark Goulston, MD, offers suggestions for navigating conversations with the people who complicate your life — not because they have a mental illness that requires treatment, but because their personality makes them plain tough to be around.
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